Monticello High School Curriculum Bulletin 2020-2021

Programs of Study 

Business – Academy of Finance Program

English Language Arts (ELA)

Family and Consumer Science

Language Other Than English (LOTE)

Math

Performing Arts

Science

Social Studies

Technology

Visual Arts

Driver Education

 

Business – Academy of Finance Program

 

Grade 9

Offered 2019-2020 & 2021-2022    

  • AOF Entrepreneurship                                               
  • AOF Delivering Great Customer Service (½)            
  • Career Exploration Internship Program (½)

Offered 2020-2021 & 2022-2023

  • AOF Principals of Hospitality and Tourism (½ )
  • AOF Sustainable Tourism (½)

 

Grade 10

Offered 2019-2020 & 2021-2022

  • AOF Entrepreneurship                                                
  • AOF Delivering Great Customer Service (½)            
  • Career Exploration Internship Program (½)                
  • Money Matters                                                            
  • AOF Event Planning 

  Offered 2020-2021 & 2022-2023

  • AOF Principals of Hospitality and Tourism (½)
  • AOF Sustainable Tourism (½)
  • Business Law
  • Money Matters
  • AOF Event Planning

 

 Grade 11

Offered 2019-2020 & 2021-2022                             

  • AOF Accounting                                                        
  • AOF English 11                                                          
  • SUNY Sullivan Computer Applications      
  • AOF Event Planning                                                  
  • AOF Entrepreneurship                                                
  • AOF Delivering Great Customer Service (½)            
  • Career Exploration Internship Program (½)                
  • Money Matters

Offered 2020-2021 & 2022-2023

  • AOF Accounting
  • AOF English 11
  • SUNY Sullivan Computer Applications
  • AOF Event Planning
  • AOF Principals of Hospitality and Tourism (½ )
  • AOF Sustainable Tourism (½)
  • Business Law
  • Money Matters  

 

Grade 12

Offered 2019-2020 & 2021-2022                             

  • AOF Financial Decision Making/ International Business
  • AOF English 12                                                          
  • SUNY Sullivan Financial Accounting                        
  • SUNY Sullivan Computer Applications                             
  • AOF Business Economics/Financial Services             
  • AOF Participation in Government                              
  • AOF Event Planning                                                  
  • AOF Delivering Great Customer Service (½)            
  • Career Exploration Internship Program (½)                
  • Money Matters                                                                      
  • AOF Entrepreneurship   

Offered 2020-2021 & 2022-2023

  • AOF Financial Decision Making/International Business
  • AOF English 12
  • SUNY Sullivan Financial Accounting
  • SUNY Sullivan Computer Applications
  • AOF Business Economics/Financial Services
  • AOF Participation in Government
  • AOF Event Planning
  • AOF Principals of Hospitality and Tourism (½)
  • AOF Sustainable Tourism (½)
  • Money Matters
  • Business Law

AOF Entrepreneurship

Full year; 1 HS credit

By generating a business plan throughout the course, students explore the  steps necessary for starting a business, including analyzing the market, finding financing, and creating a form of organization that will accommodate both immediate needs and future growth.  Students learn about regulations, protection of intellectual property, as well as the financial risks of starting a business.  Students will also spend time becoming proficient in keyboarding and learning basic business computer applications. Open to grades 9-12.   

Course offered every other year. 2019-2020. 2021-2022.

 

AOF Event Planning

Full year; 1 HS credit

Students are introduced to all aspects of planning an event, including aligning events with the client’s goals, sustainable event planning practices, facility selection and management, personnel management, audience management, budgeting, marketing, fundraising, and sponsorship.  Students also consider the role of events in the larger context of communities and society.  They realize how important events are to the health or revitalization of regions and communities.  For their culminating project, students work together as a class to host an event for their school or local community.  In groups, students take on the responsibility of one to several aspects of the planned event.  Together students plan and host the event.  Students then evaluate the event by synthesizing concepts from the course together with the event to develop an event summary.

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

 

AOF Accounting

Full year; 1 HS credit

Emphasis is placed on basic accounting theory and the flow of work through the accounting cycle.  This course covers the general journal, ledgers, and the analysis of financial statements. Manual and computer applications are explored. 

Open to AOF juniors only.

 

AOF Business Economics/Financial Services

Full year; 1 HS credit

Everything you need to know about how the economy works and where it is going will be covered in this full-year course.  Economics does not have to be complicated—it can be very interesting and very relevant to our everyday lives.  Connections are made to the vast number of industries in the business world.  You will learn about the career opportunities in the financial services industry. You will learn a logical way of thinking about economic matters through graphic representations, computer simulations, on-line research and reporting. At the end of this course you will be prepared to make rational economic choices as citizens of a state, nation, and the world.  This course will meet the economics course requirement for graduation. 

Open to AOF seniors only.

 

AOF English 11

Full year; 1 HS credit

 The 11th grade curriculum continues building upon the foundations of reading, writing, vocabulary, and communication skills needed for successful completion of a sequence in English and as outlined in the Common Core Standards for English/Language Arts. Students will prepare for the English Regents.  Students will study major authors through a variety of genres and participate in oral discussions regarding the works. Written communication will include (but not be limited to) expository writing, report writing, and genre writing. Oral and written assessment will be featured in this course. All students will be expected to complete writing for literary response and expression.

Open to AOF juniors only.

 

AOF English 12

Full year; 1 HS credit

This class satisfies the 12th grade English requirement.

This course covers the topics of writing for business audiences, improving writing techniques, revising and proofreading routine business messages, negative, persuasive and business messages, reporting data and communicating for employment. Students will learn to make decisions involving selection and organization of content and in choosing an appropriate method of presentation of information.  The use of technology and collaboration to enhance the effectiveness of business communication is covered.  Oral presentations, written business reports and proposals are required. Throughout the school year, we will also emphasize how to analyze literature from a business perspective in order to evaluate a character’s decision-making processes and attitudes toward employment, money, and society. 

Open to AOF seniors only.

 

AOF Participation in Government

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit

 Participation in Government is a course designed to illustrate to students the importance of their role as citizens in a democracy.  The point is for students to understand that they must become involved in their communities–being a good citizen is not merely voting.  This course will also look at different issues and determine how good citizens make up their minds about policy issues.  The overriding concept is the way in which we address social problems through development of public policy.  This course is project based with a significant amount of independent project work.  Critical thinking skills will be emphasized. 

Open to AOF seniors only.

 

AOF Financial Decision Making/International Business

1 year; 1 HS credit

Financial decision making and planning is the process of managing finances in order to meet life goals.  This course coordinates all aspects of finances–earning, spending, saving, investing, tax planning, retirement planning and estate planning.  The topics of credit, risk management, and insurance are also covered.  In addition, students learn federal and NYS tax law, become IRS certified, and prepare basic level tax returns for qualified community taxpayers through the IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program.

Explore the fascinating world of international business.  Learn to distinguish between domestic and international business.  Students learn the basic foundations of business within the context of the global economy.  The following topics will be covered:   Expanding abroad, foreign investment, foreign currency/exchange rates, monetary institutions, trade barriers, NAFTA, WTO, and EU.

Prerequisite AOF junior-level classes. Open to AOF seniors only.

 

Delivering Great Customer Service

1/2 year;  1/2 HS credit

This course introduces students to the concept of service as a critical component of a hospitality or tourism business. It combines current theory and practice with observations of customer service in action, role-play, and critical analysis of models. Topics include trends, the psychology of interactions between customers and providers, the phases of customer service, common mistakes, internal customer service, management, and customer feedback. Students begin to appreciate how the quality of customer service has wide-ranging implications for all professional endeavors.

Open to grades 9-12. Offered every other year.

 

AOF Principals of Hospitality and Tourism

1/2 year; 1/2 credit

This course provides an overview of the current hospitality and tourism.  Students take a brief look at the history of the industry to understand the degree to which it has changed in the past century. They learn about traveler motivation and consumer needs and how these factors affect current offerings in the lodging, transportation, food and beverage, and entertainment sectors. Students consider the economic and environmental impacts of the industry on the world today. They receive exposure to the wide array of domestic and international travel. Finally, students learn the basics of selling and marketing in tourism.

Open to grades 9-12.  Offered every other year.

 

AOF Sustainable Tourism

1/2 year; 1/2 credit

This course introduces students to the profound changes taking place worldwide in the tourism industry. Students examine the environmental and socioeconomic impacts and interrelationships of tourism, as well as the transition to a greener tourism economy. They explore the ramifications of tourism development in terms of increased sustainability, profitability, and benefits to the surrounding communities, and they examine ecotourism as a model for sustainability.

Open to grades 9-12.  Offered every other year.

 

 

SUNY Sullivan Computer Applications (cpt-1207)

Full year; 1 credit; 3 SCCC credits

This course is designed to teach students intermediate & advanced functions of MS Office software.    Students will construct and format common business documents, flyers, and multiple-page reports using Microsoft Word.  Using Microsoft Excel, students will construct and format simple spreadsheets, use formulas and functions, and enhance a workbook with charts and graphs. Using Access, students will build and modify simple data tables, create queries, on-screen forms and reports.  Using PowerPoint, students will construct and edit on-screen presentations.   

There is a per-credit fee for this course.  Open to juniors and seniors.

 

SUNY Sullivan Financial Accounting (Business 1416)

Full year; 1 HS credit; 4 SCCC credits

This course is designed to meet the needs of those students who are interested in pursuing a college Business major.  Emphasis is placed on the following topics:  completion of the accounting cycle, receivables and temporary investments, inventories, plant and intangible assets, payroll, notes payable, other current liabilities, corporate stock and dividends, and financial statement preparation. 

Open to seniors only.  Prerequisite:  AOF Accounting or instructor permission.  There is a per-credit fee for this course.

 

Business Law

Full year; 1 HS credit

Do you know that at the age of 18 you are responsible for your contractual obligations?  This course is vital for graduating seniors.  The laws which affect our everyday living from a personal and business viewpoint are discussed.  Attention is given to the following topics:  buying and selling goods, credit, insurance, personal property, real property, bailments, wills, and commercial paper and contracts.  Contemporary court decisions will also be discussed.  This course is a definite aid for any student contemplating business administration in college.

Open to grades 10-12. Offered every other year.

 

Money Matters

Full year; 1 HS credit  

Students will learn how math is used in the business world and how it is applied in a variety of business careers and in one’s personal life.  Math concepts will be learned and applied in the following areas:  Budgeting, Payroll, Banking, Investing, Real Estate, Buying a Car, Credit, Purchasing and Pricing Merchandise, and Retirement Planning.  This course is designed to prepare students for both college level business programs and to understand the complex financial world they will encounter during their lives.   For students in grades 9-12 this course may satisfy one unit of math credit ONLY if the student has successfully passed the necessary Math regents. 

 

Career Exploration Internship Program (CEIP) 

 1/2 credit 

 The Career Exploration Internship Program (CEIP) assists students in understanding the linkages among school, work, and postsecondary education. CEIP allows students to learn about a variety of career options through a non-paid worksite experience in a career area of interest. This program can be extremely beneficial to students by helping them clarify career interests and decide upon a program major in post-secondary education. It provides an opportunity for students to observe and interact with individuals in the workplace to learn more about the demands of a career they are interested in. 

Program open to all students age 14 and over. 

 (54 hours of worksite/internship experience and 27 hours of classroom instruction): the student must rotate through a minimum of two different work-stations, spending up to 27 hours at each work station, according to a specific training plan (to be developed by the WBL coordinator, employer, and student intern). 

Working papers are required.  

Interns may not be placed in any of the prohibitive occupations outlined by the NYS Department of Labor and US Department of Labor. 

The on-the-job segment of the internship may not be provided in a school setting (unless the student is specifically exploring careers in education, e.g., teacher, guidance counselor, principal, superintendent). It is the intent of this program to place the student in an outside business/industry enterprise, government agency, or private not-for-profit agency. 

Open to ages 14 and over.  Offered every other year.

 

English Language Arts  (2019-2020)

In grades 9, 10, 11 and 12, English is taught at two levels:  R and HP*

*All Honors Program (HP) students must maintain an 80 average.

Students must take at least one full credit of English each year in High School.

 

English 9R

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits 

The 9th grade curriculum builds the foundations of reading, writing, vocabulary and communication skills needed for successful completion of a sequence in English and as outlined in the SED Standards for English/Language Arts.  Students will begin preparation for the English Regents (11th grade).  Students will study major authors through a variety of genres and participate in oral discussions regarding the works.  Written communication will include (but not be limited to) expository writing, report writing, and genre writing. Oral and written assessment will be featured in this course.  All students will be expected to complete writing for literary response and expression.

 

English 9HP

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

 The 9th grade honors program  is geared essentially to the above-average student who enjoys an academic challenge.  Emphasis is placed on a whole language approach that combines thinking, reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

 

English 10R

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

The 10th grade curriculum continues to build on the foundations begun in the 9th year English program.  Additional emphasis will be given to writing and speaking as outlined in SED Standards for English/Language Arts.  A greater emphasis will be placed on students’ abilities to read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. Oral and written presentations are requirements of this course.  All students will be expected to complete writing of a critical nature.

 

English 10HP

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits 

The 10th grade honors program ) is a continuation of 9HP and is geared to the above-average student who enjoys an academic challenge.  Emphasis is placed on a whole language approach that combines thinking, reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills.

 

English 11R

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

This course continues to build upon the foundations of English 9 and 10.  There is more extensive literary analysis of a variety of genres.  Students will study major authors in their literature experience.  Preparation will be completed for students to master the work necessary for the English Regents and the extended task.

Oral and written presentations are requirements of this course.  The type of material will be determined by the teacher.  All students will be expected to complete an extended task assignment.

 

English 11HP: AP English Literature and Composition

Full year; 1 HS credit; AP Exam can earn 3 college credits

“An AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature.  Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers.  As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes as well as the smaller-scale elements, such as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone” (apcentral.collegeboard.com).  Through reading and writing across many genres, students will learn to increase their ability to synthesize and utilize information gathered during the year.  Students will read many novels, plays, short stories, poems, and literary criticisms.  Depending on the particular reading, students will write papers, create group projects, create personal projects, and prepare for the Regents.  Students will take the AP exam in May and the Regents in June.

 

12th Grade English Electives

  • Students must choose or select courses to equal 1 credit (or more) to meet their English 12 requirement. 
  • Students must take at least one full credit of English each year in High School. 
  • Students could be eligible to take senior electives earlier, however, students still need to take one full credit during their senior year as a graduation requirement.

Children’s Literature

1/2 year; 1/2 credit; 0 college credits

This course introduces students to classic children’s literature as well as to modern children’s literature, authors, and illustrators.  It concentrates on giving students a solid background in Children’s Literature and teaching the appropriate ways to read and share such literature with children of all ages.  Participants will have a laboratory feature which will include observed reading sessions with appropriately aged children.

Prerequisite: English 11

 

English 12-C: A Decades Look at Comics’ Role in Popular Culture

1/2 year; 1/2 credit; 0 college credits

This half year course will begin by looking at the Depression era and pre-war roots of comics in the United States and trace the movement and our changes through the decades.  Our study will look at historical parallels and perspectives, changes in artwork, mythological intersection in comics, and the social statements that comics have made.  This class will explore the historical trending of comics over the decades and will culminate with an intensive look at the point of impact between popular culture and comic culture within our society over the past twenty-five years. 

 

English 12- SR

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

This class uses cooperative learning as the focus while students engage in a variety of listening, writing, reading and oral communication tasks.  Students will cooperatively analyze and evaluate experiences, ideas, information and issues as they use reading, writing and comprehension strategies to problem solve based on different sets of criteria.  This class requires students to peaceably interact with each other in order for them to complete assignments focused on building skills (negotiation, inference, compromise, comprehension, time management, analysis, focus) necessary for survival and success in the global economy.

 

English 12 – Senior Regents

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits  

The purpose of this class is to provide seniors who have not passed the English Regents with the opportunity to spend a half year revisiting skills and literature that will provide additional support for this major examination.

 

Journalism

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

This sequence, offered over two semesters, provides an introduction to the role of print media in society and training in the basics of writing for newspapers and magazines.  Reading assignments will cover the history, practice and ethics of journalism.  Students will be taught the basic techniques of news gathering and be required to write breaking news stories, interviews, feature stories and cover a variety of “beats”, such as school board and town government, police and high school sports.  The basics of reporting and writing for publication will be covered during the first semester.  Students will further develop their skills in writing in-depth news and feature stories during the second semester. 

Prerequisite for Journalism I:  English 11 and approval of the instructor or the district English Coordinator. 

 

Public Speaking

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

This course will expose students to the fundamentals of public speaking.  The course concentrates on teaching the students how to determine what approach is the most effective in reaching the audience and how to deliver the prepared material most effectively.  Communication skills are stressed.

 

Science Fiction

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

Students will study a variety of classic science fiction novels, short stories, movies and television shows.  Students will learn about the history of science fiction and explore ways in which science fiction relates to real scientific and historical events.  We will also make sociological connections between the genre and our culture.  A wide variety of techniques will be employed during the semester for assessment.  Some of these include, but are not limited to, class discussion, writing assignments, presentations, and multi-media projects.  Class participation is an important part of this class, therefore excellent attendance is expected.

 

Screenwriting 1

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

Screenwriting is a step-by-step course in which students will learn the fundamentals of screenwriting, including plot structure and story design. Students will learn how to understand and use literary and visual elements in their writing.  Classic and contemporary screenplays will be read, and important films will be viewed, analyzed and discussed critically.  Students will be required to write and shoot one 20 – 30 minute screenplay.  Finished films will be shown in class and in a class sponsored film festival.

Screenwriting 2

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

Continuation of the fundamentals of screenwriting, including plot structure and story design. Students will continue to enhance their ability to understand and use literary and visual elements in their writing.  Classic and contemporary screenplays will be read, and important films will be viewed, analyzed and discussed critically.  Students will be required to write and shoot one 20 – 30 minute screenplay.  Finished films will be shown in class and in a class sponsored film festival.

(Second semester only, Prerequisite- Screenwriting 1)

Shakespeare

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

 This survey course involves reading Shakespearean plays as well as exploring the ways in which these plays have been presented in other forms of media.  The historical background of these plays will provide a framework to enhance understanding of the context in which William Shakespeare’s plays were written.  A wide variety of techniques will be employed during the semester for assessment.  Some of these include, but are not limited to, class discussion, writing assignments, presentations, and multi-media projects.  Class participation is an enormous part of this class, therefore excellent attendance is expected.

 

Sports Literature

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credit

This course will examine the complexity, beauty and changing face of sport in America through the use of multiple texts.  Through the use of sports literature and other media, the course will attempt to view the historical role of sport and develop in the students a greater sensitivity and understanding to the world of sport and to the philosophical and sociological relationship between that world and contemporary society.

 

Writing 1: A Workshop Approach

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

The goal of this course is to allow students to improve their writing skills while also learning basic computer skills.  All assignments are completed during class time on the computer.  Emphasis is placed in the editing process and on achieving a polished finished product.  Students will learn how to use Microsoft Word and will develop an understanding of the general principles of word processing while working on a variety of writing projects.  In addition, students will learn how to use drawing programs to create illustrations that will be integrated into the writing projects.  The internet will be used as a tool for assignments.  Typing ability is recommended but not required, though this is not a class that will teach typing skills.  Excellent attendance is expected. (First or Second semester)

 

Writing 2: A Workshop Approach

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

In this follow-up course, students will continue to improve their writing skills while being introduced to the art of desktop publishing.  Students will be introduced to the basic conventions of publishing and will learn to cooperate and share responsibility through group projects.  Using computer programs such as Photoshop and Publisher, students will create a variety of publications, including newspapers and pamphlets, as well as create original products such as their own restaurant.  Emphasis will be placed on page layout or the art of combining text and illustrations into a unified presentation.  The internet will be integrated into assignments.  Excellent attendance is expected.

(Second semester only; Prerequisite: Writing 1)

 

SUPA English

Full year; 1 HS credit; 6 SU credits

This course is two semester courses; you must take both semesters.  The courses are:

SUPA Writing 105

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 3 Syracuse University credits 

Writing 105 is offered through Syracuse University’s Project Advance.  This course pays particular attention to writing as a means of learning and as a way of encouraging active intellectual engagement.  Learning how to write formal academic analysis and argument begins with learning how to think reflectively in various kinds of informal written modes, such as reading logs, class correspondences, and response papers.  Classes are organized around topics of inquiry that become focal points for numerous reading and frequent writing assignments.  Students who successfully complete the course receive three (3) college credits from Syracuse – transferable to hundreds of colleges and universities. 

Prerequisite:  recommendation by teacher, one semester, ½ credit.  Students must enroll in both Writing 105 and English 141.  There is a per credit fee for this and all Project Advance Courses.

 

SUPA English 141

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 3 Syracuse University credits

This course is offered through Syracuse University’s Project Advance.  Students who successfully complete the course receive three (3) college credits from Syracuse – transferable to hundreds of colleges and universities.  The course focuses on reading and interpretation.  Students read a variety of texts in order to discover how their reading of a text relies upon implicit understanding of signs that are not only culturally established, but also part of a system that operates through complex relationships.  Students write frequently:  informal papers, reading logs, reactions, and a specified number of longer formal papers drawing on material covered in the course. 

Prerequisite:  recommendation by teacher, one semester, ½ credit.  Students must enroll in both Writing 105 and this course.  There is a per credit fee for this and all Project Advance Courses. 

 

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Family and Consumer Science

 

Grades 10 – 12

  • Basic Food Preparation and Nutrition
  • Global/Gourmet I
  • Global/Gourmet II
  • Child Development and Early Childhood Education
  • Parenting
  • Fashion
  • Clothing Design and Creation

 

Grades 11-12

  • Independent Living

 

Basic Food Preparation and Nutrition

Full year; 1 HS credit

This course is a basic beginner course in food preparation and nutrition.  Students will have “hands on” opportunities to develop skills in food preparation, meal planning and organizing kitchen work areas.  In addition, students will learn about career opportunities in the food service industry.  Students will use typical kitchen equipment in this class.  Students practice budgeting and also examine nutritional factors that affect health throughout the lifespan. 

 

AOF Entrepreneurship

Full year; 1 HS credit

By generating a business plan throughout the course, students explore the steps necessary for starting a business, including analyzing the market, finding financing, and creating a form of organization that will accommodate both immediate needs and future growth.  Students learn about regulations, protection of intellectual property, as well as the financial risks of starting a business.  Students will also spend time becoming proficient in keyboarding and learning basic business computer applications. Open to grades 9-12.   Course offered every other year. 2019-2020. 2021-2022.

 

Child Development and Early Childhood Education

Full year; 1 HS credit

This full-year course covers the physical, emotional, intellectual, and social development of a child from infancy to school-age.  Students will examine parenting skills, prenatal development, daily care, and guidance.  Students will participate in a field experience during the 2nd semester.  Students interested in a career in teaching, health care, or psychology are encouraged to enroll in this class.

 

Global/Gourmet Foods I 

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit

A half-unit course in which students will explore a variety of culturally specific foods from the United States.  Students will learn preparation techniques.  Students will gain an understanding of cultural difference and the interdependence of regions in the United States as well as the ecological consequences of choices in the use of the environment and natural resources. Through the study of specific foods, current and future food careers will be explored.

Prerequisite: Basic Food Preparation and Nutrition

 

Global/Gourmet Foods II

1/2 year; 1/2 credit

A half-unit course in which students will explore a variety of culturally specific international foods.  Students will learn preparation techniques with an emphasis on food appearance and presentation.  Students will gain an understanding of cultural difference, interdependence of regions and countries around the world. Through the study of specific foods, current and future food careers will be explored.

Prerequisite: Basic Food, Preparation, and Nutrition

Parenting

1/2  year; 1/2 credit

This half-unit course will provide students with a broad foundation of the knowledge, skill, and attitudes necessary to promote quality growth and development of children and families in school, community, and workplace settings.  Students will develop an understanding of the diversity of families and how diversity impacts parenting choices and outcomes.  Students will have the opportunity to examine the wide variety of career paths in community and family services, and to identify the knowledge and skills necessary for success within the field. 

Fashion

1/2 year; 1/2 credit

This half-unit course will introduce students to the fashion industry.  Students will have multiple opportunities to identify the knowledge and skills necessary for success in the fashion industry and assess their suitability for a fashion career.  Clothing history, culture, design principles, merchandising, and current issues will be explored.

Sewing

1/2 year; 1/2 credit

This half-unit course will be laboratory based offering students the opportunity to complete projects including handling special fabrics, creating a garment using a pattern and altering & repairing clothing.  Students will become proficient in sewing machine operation and hand stitching. 

Independent Living

1/2 year; 1/2 credit

The Independent Living course is designed to prepare students for the realities and responsibilities of managing all aspects of adulthood: education, career, interpersonal relationships, civic involvement, and financial security. Students will need the ability to make knowledge-based decisions as they learn to navigate the demands of the 21st century. Defining one’s lifestyle goals and developing a plan to attain them is the core of this course.

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Languages Other Than English (LOTE)

 

Spanish 1 (Checkpoint A: Beginner)

Grades 9 – 12, full year, 1 credit

Students will develop basic proficiency skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language.  They will be introduced to different cultures and compare these cultures with their own.

NOTE: New York State requires that all students earn one credit in Languages Other Than English (LOTE) in order to graduate High School.  This course satisfies the LOTE requirement for high school graduation.

Students who wish to continue to the next level of language study must pass this course with a minimum grade of 80%.

 

Spanish 2 (Checkpoint B: Intermediate Part 1)

Grades 9 – 12, full year, 1 credit

Students will communicate (listen, speak, read, and write) about situations in the past, present, and future.  They will increase their vocabulary in the target language and continue to explore target cultures.

Prerequisite: Pass the Sullivan County Language Proficiency Exam OR pass Level 1 LOTE with a minimum grade of 80%.

 

French 3, Spanish 3 (Checkpoint B: Intermediate Part 2)

Grades 9 – 12, full year, 1 credit

This course is a continuation of Level 2 language study and completes the preparatory material for the comprehensive examination for regents’ credit at Checkpoint B.  Communication in the target language and knowledge of target cultures are the primary goals.

Prerequisite: Pass Level 2 LOTE.

 

Spanish 3/4 NS: Advanced Spanish for Native Speakers (Checkpoint B/Checkpoint C: Intermediate Part 2/Advanced)

Grades 9 – 12, full year, 1 credit

This course is for native speakers of Spanish who read and write at an intermediate or advanced level.  Students will expand their vocabulary and further develop their communication skills while exploring a variety of Latino cultures and dialects.  Students who have not yet taken the comprehensive examination for regents’ credit will take the exam in June.

Prerequisite: Middle School Spanish for Native Speakers OR recommendation of language teacher

 

French Through Culture and Film/Spanish Through Culture and Film

Iconic French Figures/Iconic Hispanic Figures

(Checkpoint C: Advanced; equivalent to French 4/5 and Spanish 4/5)

Grades 11 – 12, full year, 1 credit

In this advanced level language course students virtually travel the world.  Students use advanced language skills to prepare for becoming part of today’s multilingual world and global economy.   Students enrolled in this course will work towards earning the New York State Seal of Biliteracy upon graduation.  An alternating two-year curriculum is offered.

Prerequisite: Pass Level 3 LOTE, including the comprehensive examination for regents’ credit

 

AP Spanish Language (Advanced)

Grades 11 – 12, full year, 1 credit

This rigorous course is a continuation of SPANISH 4/5.  The class is conducted in Spanish and targeted to students who have complete four years or the equivalent of high school Spanish.  Students review previous topics while practicing advanced grammatical concepts and further refining their abilities to speak, write and understand Spanish.

Students will take the College Board Spanish Language Advanced Placement exam in May.  There is an additional fee for the AP exam.

Prerequisite: pass SPANISH 4 and 5 or equivalent AND recommendation of teacher

 

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Math

Algebra 1

This is the first course in the high school math sequence with a Regents exam in June.  The primary focus of this course is to build a solid foundation in the skills of algebra and problem-solving techniques.  Students will also gain skills in writing mathematically to model real-life applications of mathematics.  The main topics of this course include working with number systems and their associated operations, working with algebraic symbols and their usefulness in problem solving, working with the mathematical processes and their associated patterns, working with coordinate geometry for analyzing problem-solving situations, working with data and its organization into different display methods for analysis, working with probability to determine the likelihood of events.  A TI-NSpire graphing calculator and computer software programs are integral components of the course.  Students will receive one credit for successful completion of this course.

Note:  This course is a graduation requirement.

 

Algebra 1 with Lab

This is the first course in the high school math sequence with a Regents exam in June.  This class incorporates a mathematics instructional lab to provide additional support for students to meet the increased rigor of this course.  The primary focus of this course is to build a solid foundation in the skills of algebra and problem-solving techniques.  Students will also gain skills in writing mathematically to model real-life applications of mathematics.  The main topics of this course include working with number systems and their associated operations, working with algebraic symbols and their usefulness in problem solving, working with the mathematical processes and their associated patterns, working with coordinate geometry for analyzing problem-solving situations, working with data and its organization into different display methods for analysis, working with probability to determine the likelihood of events.  A TI-NSpire graphing calculator and computer software programs are integral components of the course.  Students will receive one credit for successful completion of this course.

Note:  This course is a graduation requirement.

 

Algebra 1A

This course, aligned with the Common Core Learning Standards, is the first year of a two year program, which is designed for students with an IEP who need to build a foundation for Algebra 1.  A slower pace will allow in-depth exposure to the topic units and prepare students to take the more rigorous, second half of the course, Algebra 1B.  Approximately half of the units of Algebra 1 will be covered.  There will be a department final exam during finals in June. 

 

Algebra 1B

This course continues the topics from the Algebra 1A course towards taking the Algebra 1 Regents in June.  Algebra skills are reviewed and strengthened through problem solving and real-world problems.  Students will take the Algebra 1 Regents exam in June.

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra 1A

 

Intermediate Algebra 2

This is a second year mathematics course.  This course is intended for students who struggle with algebra concepts.  They have passed the Algebra 1 course but have not passed the Algebra 1 Regents Exam.  Students will explore topics from Algebra 1 more in depth. Students receive one math credit for successfully completing this course.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 Course without successful completion of the Regents Exam.

 

Intermediate Geometry

Intermediate Geometry is a one-year, non-regents, Geometry course that is a standards-based, Euclidean geometry course which meets the criteria for the state’s geometry curriculum. This course explores the basic topics of geometry including plane and solid figures, coordinate geometry, reasoning and constructing arguments. The major difference between Intermediate Geometry and Regents Geometry is the amount of formal proofs that are written in this curriculum. There are more hands-on activities and more real-life geometry problems versus abstract problem solving. Students will receive one credit for successful completion of this course.

Recommendation:  Final Algebra 1 grade of 65-70.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 Course and successful completion of the Regents Exam.

 

Geometry

Geometry is the second course in the advanced regents diploma sequence. This is a one-year, in-depth and challenging Geometry course with a Regents exam in June.  Students will identify and justify geometric relationships, formally and informally. Students will be expected to learn geometric definitions, properties, and axioms in order to prove and/or disprove Euclidean, coordinate, inequality, and indirect theorems/proofs. Students receive one math credit for successfully completing this course.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and the Algebra 1 Regents exam.  Final Algebra 1 grade of 80 or higher. 

Geometry with Lab

Geometry with Lab is the second course in the advanced regents diploma sequence.  This is a one-year, in-depth and challenging Geometry course with a Regents exam in June. The class incorporates a mathematics instructional lab to provide additional support for students to meet the increased rigor of this course.  Students will identify and justify geometric relationships, formally and informally.

Students will be expected to learn geometric definitions, properties, and axioms in order to prove and/or disprove Euclidean, coordinate, inequality, and indirect theorems/proofs. Students receive one math credit for successfully completing this course.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Algebra 1 course and the Algebra 1 Regents exam. Final Algebra 1 grade of 70 or higher. 

 

Algebra 2

Algebra 2 and Trigonometry is the third course in the three-year advanced regents diploma sequence for mathematics and is a must course for students who have their sights set on attending college. This course will help you understand how mathematics relates to the world using real-life application problems and prepares students for advanced study. The scope and content of this course includes: equations and inequalities, relations and functions, trigonometric functions, logarithms, exponential and quadratic functions, statistics and probability.  This course will help prepare students for the Algebra 2 and Trigonometry Regents exam in June as well as the next level of mathematics.  Students receive one math credit for successfully completing this course.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry course and passing grade on the Geometry Regents exam.  Algebra and Geometry final grade of 75 or higher or successful completion of College Algebra.

 

Algebra 2 with Lab

Algebra 2 and Trigonometry is the third course in the three-year advanced regents diploma sequence for mathematics and is a must course for students who have their sights set on attending college. The class incorporates a mathematics instructional lab to provide additional support for students to meet the increased rigor of this course.  This course will help you understand how mathematics relates to the world using real-life application problems and prepares students for advanced study. The scope and content of this course includes: equations and inequalities, relations and functions, trigonometric functions, logarithms, exponential and quadratic functions, statistics and probability.  This course will help prepare students for the Algebra 2 and Trigonometry Regents exam in June as well as the next level of mathematics.  Students receive one math credit for successfully completing this course.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry course and passing grade on the Geometry Regents exam.  Algebra and Geometry final grade of 70 or higher or successful completion of College Algebra.

 

College Algebra

This course is a non-Regents course for those students who have completed Geometry.  Topics of this course prepare students for a college level algebra course.  It includes applications of rational expressions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions.  Further study of systems and polynomials are also included. If time allows, additional topics may include sequence and series and trig graphing.  Students receive one math credit for successfully completing this course.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Regents Geometry.

College Prep Math

This course is designed for seniors only who have not successfully completed Geometry course.  The College Prep Math course will improve arithmetic skills without use of the calculator  while covering topics from Algebra and Geometry. The class requires students to problem solve, interpret statistical data and graphs, apply geometric and study linear and quadratic equations. Students receive one high school math credit for successfully completing this course.  Also, students who have a final average of 75 or above may meet the entrance criteria into the SCCC’s BUS 1101 and MAT 1000 courses.

 

College level MATH Courses

SCCC Precalculus ( MAT1206 )/Precalculus (Local)

4 credits

This Sullivan County Community College course in which students will receive four college credits and one unit of high school math. This course is intended to form a bridge between the static concepts of algebra and geometry and the dynamic concepts of the calculus. Topics include basic algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; functional inverses; inequalities; graphs; complex numbers; systems of equations; introductory matrix algebra; and the binomial theorem. 

There is a per credit fee for students intending to use this course to earn college credit.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 and Trigonometry and the Algebra 2 and Trigonometry Regents exam.

 

SCCC Calculus ( MAT1301)

4 Credits

This Sullivan County Community College course challenges the talented mathematical student to work to their full potential.  Calculus is a college level course. This course is offered for the students in the accelerated program or any student who has successfully completed Precalculus.  The course includes an in-depth study of limits, differential calculus and its applications, and integral calculus with its applications.  Students who earn good grades in this course can receive college credit or placement from most colleges.

There is a per credit fee for students intending to use this course to earn college credit.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Precalculus.

 

SCCC Elementary Statistics

( MAT2501) 3 Credits

This Sullivan County Community College course in which students will receive three college credits and one unit of high school math. The course is designed to show students how statistics is used to picture and describe the world and to show them that statistics is used to make informed decisions. Topics include probability, frequency distribution, mean and standard deviation, binomial distribution, testing hypothesis, samples from a finite population, regression and correlation. The course may be taken in conjunction with Precalculus or Calculus.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 and Trigonometry.

 

Intermediate Algebra (SCCC)

Full year; 1 HS Credit.  Students review basic algebra and learn about polynomials, radicals, and linear inequalities. They learn to graph and work with linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, and exponential functions.

Prerequisite: DMA 0995 Basic Algebra with a C- or better, or at least one year of NYS high school Regents level mathematics with a 75% or higher on at least one Regents math exam.

 

STEAM Math

Full Year; 1 HS credit

This is a one year non-Regents math course offered to students embarking on a STEAM pathway or students that will not have 3Math/3Science Regents exams. It is designed as a prerequisite to introduce the necessary math specific skills needed for success in the journey. The course will cover various production and design topics. Students will build (literally) upon their existing math skills by drafting and erecting scale models, developing product prototypes, calculating bids and the cost of doing business, and so much more.

Prerequisite courses: Algebra 1 Regents & 1 credit in Geometry (RE Geo, Geo w/lab, or Intermediate Geo).

 

Introduction to Computer Science

Full Year; 1 HS credit

This course is for students who have successfully completed the Algebra I course and Regents Exam. It is also the foundation course for the Information Technology Journey.

The course is designed to expose students to the interdisciplinary nature of computer science in today’s dynamic and globally connected society. Student will have the opportunity to explore the use of computer science as a tool in creating effective solutions to complex contemporary problems. The hands on nature of the course is intended to provide students with the opportunity to explore conceptual understanding in a practical learning environment The course is recommended for all students as it provides an overview of computer science an its applications in various disciplines, professions, and personal activities. The course will provide opportunities for students to use computational thinking and develop algorithmic solutions to real-world problems. They will begin to understand the different levels of complexity in problem solving and determine when team projects might generate more effective problem solutions than individual efforts. Students will learn and us a programming language(s) and related tools, as well as appropriate collaboration tools, computing devices and networking environment. Finally, they will demonstrate an understanding of the social and ethical implications of their work and exhibit appropriate communication when working as a team member. This course is an elective.

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of the Algebra I Course and Regents Exam

 

Computer Gaming

1/2 Year; 1/2 HS credit

Stop playing and start creating! Monticello High School is going to transform the high school computer class by offering students the opportunity to earn how modern games are created. This course will demystify the process and make programming easy. It is an introductory course in game making which will give students the basic understanding necessary to break into the gaming world. It prepares you for AP Java. It will apply concepts as seen in the programming language Alice, as well as incorporate Java.

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of the Algebra I Course and Regents Exam and Introduction to Computer Science. For the IT Journey, there is an additional requirement of Introduction to Game History.

 

 

AP Computer Science A

The AP Computer Science A course emphasizes problem solving, algorithm development, and elementary data structures. It is also the next course to follow Java Programming. Students who complete the course and score well on the AP exam may qualify for on-semester of college credit at institutions that accept it.

Prerequisite: Java Programming or Permission of instructor

 

AP Computer Science Principles

AP Computer Science Principles introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. AP Computer Science Principles is designed with the goal of creating leaders in computer science fields and attracting and engaging those who are traditionally underrepresented with essential computing tools and multidisciplinary opportunities. Students who complete the course and score well on the AP exam may qualify for one-semester of college credit at institutions that accept it. With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, AP Computer Science Principles prepares students for college and career.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science

 

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Performing Arts (2020-2021)

The Performing Arts inspires and develops the intellectual and creative potential of our students. Cited for eight years as one of the Best Communities for Music Education in the country, Monticello High School offers a comprehensive and high quality program in Music and Dance.

Knowledge Courses – Music

Advanced Placement Music Theory

Full year; 1 credit

This course is designed for the student who is fluent in music reading. Demands of this course are comparable in content and expected level of accomplishment to a first year college music theory course. Strong emphasis is given to listening skills, particularly those involving recognition and comprehension of the musical elements and compositional techniques.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Grade 11 or 12. .

 

Music Technology

Full Year; 1 credit

  Music Technology is a course designed to give students an insight into the world of sound recording, audio production, and music creation.  The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of music through listening, performing and creating with a focus on using modern music based technologies.  Students will learn the art of audio recording, composing using electronic devices, editing music and mixing sounds.  The class will also utilize a variety of professional grade production programs to explore the art of sound and music creation, including Garageband and Logic Pro.  In addition, students will explore the different areas of the modern music industry where music technology is used most, such as podcast creation, commercial production, movie scoring and album mixing. Music Technology is open all high school students (10-12) who have taken a music course in 9th grade, or by permission of instructor.

 

History of Music

Full year; 1 credit

Designed for the serious music student, this full year course surveys the music of the Modern Era (Pop, Rock, Jazz, Hip-Hop) and its predecessors in cultural and stylistic context. This hands-on course develops informed listening skills to help students understand the changes in musical style and compositional technique over the centuries, and does so through interactive experiences including field trips to local music venues (Bethel Woods, Walkway Across the Hudson and Bridge Music, Woodstock Museum, etc) and Field Trips to major exhibits and venues in NYC (Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Musical Instrument Exhibit, the Juilliard School, Columbia University’s Miller Hall etc.). Students will listen to, perform and compose works from plainchant to the present using traditional musical instruments as well as technology-based resources (Logic, Garageband etc.). Students will also explore relevant historic, social, political and technological events to help them understand the context in which composers and performers created their music.  

Pre requisite: Music teacher recommendation or permission of instructor.  Grades 10, 11, 12.  

 

Performance Courses – Music

As part of the Performing Arts program, students are given the opportunity to perform in varying types of both small and large ensembles. In addition, several music electives include small group lessons that students take once a week. These lessons rotate by period through the week and are scheduled during the school day as part of the course requirement. Students are expected to practice daily in preparation for their lessons. These lessons allow students to receive individual attention, and reinforcement of the physical and mental skills needed to succeed in their performance based course.

Emerging Ensembles

Grades 9-12, full year; 1 credit

Formerly referred to as Chamber Music, this course is designed to enrich the advanced performance student. Students work in small ensembles designed by instructors. The group participates in school concerts, assemblies, civic events, and NYSSMA Evaluation Festivals.

Prerequisite: Music teacher recommendation or permission of instructors.

 

Concert Band/Wind Ensemble

Grades 9-12, full year; 1 credit

Concert Band or Wind Ensemble are organizations composed of woodwind, brass and percussion students. Students will learn an extensive repertoire representing the best of the world’s music, balanced by attention to theory, skill development and listening. The groups participate in school concerts, assemblies, civic events and NYSSMA Evaluation Festivals. Placement in either the Concert Band or Wind Ensemble is based on the individual student’s ability level, seating audition, and instrumentation needs of the ensemble.

Prerequisite: Participation in Middle School performing groups OR an audition. Rotation lessons required. . 

 

Intermediate String Orchestra 

Grade 9, full year; 1 credit

This course serves to connect the technical and musical skills learned in the Middle School Orchestra with those needed for the professional level literature of the Advanced String Orchestra. Students will play NYSSMA level 3-4 music and have the opportunity for performance in school concerts and the NYSSMA evaluation festival. Rotation lessons are required.

Prerequisite: Middle School Orchestra or an audition. 

 

Advanced String Orchestra 

Grades 10-12, full year; 1 credit

Through contact with an extensive repertoire of String Orchestra literature, performance of NYSSMA level 5-6 music, balanced by attention to theory, skill development and listening, this organization provides the students with the opportunity of performing in school concerts, the annual spring musical, civic events and the NYSSMA Evaluation Festival.

Prerequisite: Participation in Intermediate String Orchestra or an audition. Rotation Lessons required. 

 

Concert Choir

Grades 9-12, full year; 1 credit

Participation in this organization will provide students with an advanced choral music experience. Emphasis is on listening skills, proper vocal technique, music reading, and basic terminology and concert preparation. This group participates in school concerts, assemblies, civic events and the NYSSMA Evaluation Festival.

Prerequisite: Participation in Middle School performing groups OR an audition.  Rotation lessons required. 

 

Performance Skills I. II. III

Grades 9-12, full year; 1 credit

This course is designed for continued study on instruments not typically used in the traditional performing organizations. Available for study are: keyboard instruments (piano, electric keyboard) and guitar (acoustic, electric and bass guitar).  In addition to learning guitar and keyboard other opportunities exist including but not limited to banjo, ukulele, mandolin, recorder, popular and jazz singing, and some music technology. Students will learn repertoire representative of different musical styles, balanced with written theory and listening skills.  Participation in NYSSMA Evaluation and taking advantage of performing opportunities is strongly encouraged.  All students will perform in solo and/or small group settings in front of their peers.  Rotation lessons on guitar or piano are required.

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation. 

 

Performance Courses – Dance

Dance I

Grades 9-12, full year; 1 credit

Dance I provides an in-depth introduction to dance.  This dance class is designed to expose new dancers to ballet, jazz, and street jazz/hip hop.  Student learning includes opportunities to develop kinesthetic awareness, proper body alignment, physical strength, flexibility, and endurance.  Dance elements and basic principles of composition are studied and practiced.  Students use creative and critical thinking skills to create and communicate meaning through dance movement.  Students experience the role of both choreographer and dancer and have opportunities to present their work.  Through the study of dance in various cultures and historical periods, students broaden their understanding of dance as an art form.  Throughout the year students will have the opportunity and will be expected to participate in performances.  It is mandatory that all students perform in the annual Spring Dance Concert.  All female students in beginner dance need half sole shoes, skin tone tights, black tights, and a black leotard.  All male students need black dance half sole shoes, black jogger/fitted pants, and a black v-neck t-shirt.  No pre-requisites are required for this course.  

 

Dance II

Grades 9 -12 *May be taken multiple years. Full year; 1 credit

The Dance II course is designed to increase the ability of the devoted dancer.  It emphasizes students’ acquisition of intermediate movement skills and refined motor control through the study of various dance techniques, including ballet, modern, and jazz/street jazz.  Students further their development of skills progressing from beginning dance through exploration of improvisation, dance elements, and composition as both dancer and choreographer.  Students extend their understanding of dance as an art form through consideration of aesthetic and philosophical perspectives.  Further awareness is enhanced through the study of dance kinesiology, dance history, and choreography. Students will study various modern dance elements such as Alvin Ailey American Dance theater and Laban movement.  They will also extend their knowledge into jazz through vocabulary and technique. Throughout the year students will have the opportunity and will be expected to participate in performances. Students will perform in the December Holiday show and the Spring dance showcase.  All female students need half sole shoes, nude tights, black tights, and a black leotard.  All male students need black half sole shoes, black jogger fitted pants, and a black v-neck t-shirt. 

Prerequisite: Dance I and/or teacher recommendation. 

 

Elements of Dance (Dance III)

Grades 10-12,  full year; 1 credit

This course is a sequential knowledge based course, designed for students who have technical dance experience through previous high school credits and/or private study.  The scope of this course offers students a study of dance in terms of history, styles, criticism, technical and stage production, choreography/improvisation, performance, artistic processes, collaboration, cultural influences, self-identity and advocacy.  Dancers are expected to perform for multiple occasions through the school year including, December Holiday Performance, Monti High Dance Competition, Spring Dance Show, and other community events.  Dancers will perform their own original work as well as the class choreography. All female students need half sole shoes, nude tights, black tights, and a black leotard.  All male students need black half sole shoes, black jogger fitted pants, and a black v-neck t-shirt

 Prerequisite: Dance I, II and/or teacher recommendation. 

 

Dance Music Collaborative (Dance IV)

Grades 10-12, full year; 1 credit 

This course strives to establish the dancers as collaborative artists, choreographers, and soloist performers. The goal is to create a constructivist atmosphere where students work to explore a broader connection to the performing arts by using multiple levels of genres of dance.  With this understanding, students are expected to engage in collaborations with other dancers, and artists to demonstrate their knowledge through literacy, choreography and performance.   Dancers are required to perform multiple pieces in the Holiday Dance Show, 1-2 pieces in the Monti High Dance Competition, and multiple pieces in the spring show.  The possibility exists that some dancers may remain in Dance IV for multiple years and may not progress fully to Dance V. All female students need half sole shoes, nude tights, black tights, and a black leotard.  All male students need black half sole shoes, black jogger fitted pants, and a black v-neck t-shirt

Prerequisite: Dance I, II, III and/or teacher recommendation. 

 

Advanced Studio Dance (Dance V)

Grades 11-12, full year; 1 credit 

Students in Advanced Studio Dance are also Monticello Dance Company members. They are leaders in the dance community and are expected to perform in community events as much as possible. Majority of ASD are members of or will be becoming members of the National Honor Society for Dance Arts. ASD student’s must perform and create solos, choreograph and perform in small group choreography, perform multiple pieces in the Holiday dance show, Monti High Dance Competition, and the Spring Dance show.  Students may also be dance interns and take leadership responsibility with creating shows, co teaching/assisting lower level dance classes and finding multiple performance opportunities. All female students need half sole shoes, nude tights, black tights, and a black leotard.  All male students need black half sole shoes, black jogger fitted pants, and a black v-neck t-shirt

Prerequisite: Dance II, III, III, IV and/or teacher recommendation.  

 

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Science 

2020-2021 School Year

Science Regents Courses

Courses requiring a NYS Regents Examination and successful completion of lab requirements.

Regents Living Environment 

Full year; 1 HS credit

This course studies the unity and diversity among living things, homeostasis in organisms, human anatomy and physiology, reproduction and development, genetic continuity, evolution, organisms in their environment and human impact on ecosystems. The Living Environment Regents curriculum and standards are adhered to throughout this course. Students are required to complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of successful hands-on laboratory skills. A Regents examination is required following the completion of the lab requirement.   

 

Regents Earth Science

Full year; 1 HS credit

This course follows the New York State Regents curriculum and standards for Earth Science–The Physical Setting.  Topics include minerals, rocks, earth’s motion, dimensions and history, earthquakes, oceanography, astronomy, meteorology, the water cycle and climates, atmospheric energy, landscape development and environmental change, deposition, weathering and erosion. Students are required to complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of successful hands-on laboratory skills. A Regents examination and Lab Practical are required following the completion of the lab requirement.   

 

Regents Chemistry 

Full year; 1 HS credit

The course content includes the fundamental laws and principals of chemical structure and reactivity.  Specific areas of focus are equilibrium, acids and bases, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry and introductory organic chemistry. Students are required to complete a minimum of 1200 minutes of successful hands-on laboratory skills. They must take the New York State Physical Setting Chemistry Exam.

Prerequisite: Integrated Algebra

 

Regents Physics

Full year; 1HS credit

Physics is the foundation of modern science and technology and is recommended for any college-bound student. The course only requires basic algebraic math skills. It is an essential course for any student planning to study engineering or the sciences.  The course demonstrates the connection of physics to the everyday world, using Einstein’s maxim “Physics is common sense refined”.  The course includes the study of energy and its transformations, mechanics, wave motion, electricity, magnetism, light, and nuclear physics.  An emphasis is given to application of principles and Problems.  A Regents examination is required following the completion of the lab requirement.   

Prerequisite: Completion and passing of the Integrated Algebra Regents. 

 

9th Grade Honors Regents Physics

Full year; 1 HS credit

Physics is the foundation of modern science and technology and is recommended for any college-bound student. It is an essential course for any student planning to study engineering or the sciences.  The course demonstrates the connection of physics to the everyday world, using Einstein’s maxim “Physics is common sense refined”.  The course includes the study of energy and its transformations, mechanics, wave motion, electricity, magnetism, light, and nuclear physics.  An emphasis is given to application of principles and problems.  A Regents examination is required following the completion of the lab requirement.   

Prerequisite: Completion and passing of the Integrated Algebra Regents plus recommendation of 8th grade team.

 

Science Pathway Courses – These courses do not require a NYS Regents exam.

 

9th Grade Environmental Science (*Cap at 2 sections, 1-2 special)

Full year; 1 HS credit

This is an introductory environmental science course intended to prepare students for Regents level Living Environment. It enables students to develop an understanding of natural and man-made environments and environmental problems the world faces. Students explore environmental science concepts including Earth Systems, The Living World, Human Population, Water and Land Resources, Energy Resources and Consumption, Pollution and Waste Production, Global Change, and Civic Responsibility.  This course builds the following skills:  scientific reading, evidence based writing, vocabulary acquisition, scientific research, graphing, interpreting diagrams, organizational skills, study habits, laboratory techniques, inquiry based lab skills, independent work habits, and test taking strategies. 

Prerequisite: Recommendation by 8th grade team.

 

Practical Chemistry I & II

2 semesters; 1/2 credit each

Practical chemistry will investigate the basic principles of chemistry and relate it to real world experiences. This course is a thematic approach to how chemistry impacts our daily lives. It is inquiry-based with a lot of time spent in the laboratory. This course is not intended for students interested in a career in science, engineering, or medical fields.  We will only discuss the foundations of chemistry.

 Prerequisite: 1 unit of Math, Regents Living Environment and Earth Science

 

Science and Society I & II

2 semesters; 1/2 credit each

The purpose of the course is to provide students with worthwhile academic tasks that enable them to explore many aspects of science including the scientific method, chemistry, geology, astronomy, environmental studies and their effects on society.  Science and Society allows students to increase scientific conceptual background. The order of the curriculum may vary due to current events, emergent trends, and recent advances. Science and Society is a two-semester video and research based program that prepares students for a variety of options including community or career applications. Whether students are audio, visual or kinesthetic learners, they benefit from information received from a variety of sources. An additional purpose is to reflect upon the current conceptions of science and technology as they are influenced by and influence society. 

Pre-requisite: LE or 1 Regents science credit; Suggested co-enrollment in Earth Science

 

Anatomy and Physiology I & II

2 semesters; 1/2 credit each

Anatomy and Physiology is a two-semester course that guides the students along the journey from understanding the cellular and tissue levels of organization and throughout the various systems of the body which work together to maintain homeostasis. Students use drawing and interpreting full color illustrations to provide visual reinforcement of the major concepts.  Art can help students create and keep mental pictures of the various systems. Special conditions such as diseases and disorders are noted throughout the curriculum. Semester 1 focuses on the chemical basis of life explaining the building blocks of cellular structures, metabolism, and the transport materials throughout the body.

Semester 2 is a journey through the various systems of the body. Each system sets the stage for explaining, in general terms, what each system does and the organs it contains.

Prerequisite: Regents Living Environment & Principles of Health Science; Suggested co-enrollment: Regents Chemistry or Regents Physics for 4 Core Sciences.

 

Alternative Energy I

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit

Students will explore various traditional and alternative energy sources. Students will learn about wind, water solar, and nuclear alternative to fossil fuels. The effects of acid rain and the pH of solutions’ will be explored. Students will be provided opportunities to experiment with solar vehicles and wind generation. Testing water-pressurized rockets to test force and motion and so much more. This is science elective or can be used for credit in the Envision and Build Journey.

Prerequisite: Regents Living Environment

 

Alternative Energy II

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit

Projects in Alternative Energy II will be student driven and based on interest utilizing skills learned in Alternative Energy 1. Projects should demonstrate advanced skills and students will present their culminating project to an audience. This is science elective or can be used for credit in the Envision and Build Journey.

Prerequisite: Regents Living Environment and Alternative Energy I

 

Principles of Health Science

Full year; 1 HS credit

This is a one-year non-regents foundational course for the Pre-Health Sciences Journey (not a senior elective). Students with an interest in a future in the medical/health fields will explore an overview of therapeutic, diagnostic, environmental and informational systems. Topics include career requirements, medical history, trends in financing healthcare, ethical and legal responsibilities, First Aid and CPR/AED. Students will prepare for work-based experiences.

Pre-requisite: Living Environment or co-enrollment with Living Environment

 

Medical Interventions

Full year; 1 HS credit

This is a non-Regents STEM course that will study the life of a typical family. Students will evaluate various medical interventions that can be utilized in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease.  Gaining knowledge related to infection, cancer, immunology, gene therapy, surgery, pharmacology, prosthetics, and other medical devices. The central focus of the course is understanding how to maintain a constant healthy state of being.

 Prerequisite: Principles of Health Science and Regents Living Environment; Suggested co-enrollment with another Regents Science for 4 Core Sciences.

 

College Level Science Courses

SCCC Chemistry for Health Science

1/2 Year- Semester Course; 1/2 HS credit, 4 College Credits

Students utilize an inquiry approach to the learning of chemical principles with examples and cases studies taken from the health sciences. Material covered is divided into three parts: general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry with emphasis on the relevance of each to health professions. Experiments will illustrate basic concepts relevant to the allied health science fields including nursing, respiratory therapy, radiological technology, etc. Hands-on activities will be assigned and lab reports will be required to complete the assignments. Students who have not taken Regents Chemistry should expect to work extra hard to learn the material.

Prerequisite: Principles of Health Science and Regents Living Environment; Suggested co-enrollment with another Regents Science for 4 Core Sciences or must have rec from Science DIL.

 

SUPA Forensic Science

Full year; 1 HS credit; 4 college credits each

Forensic Science focuses upon the application of scientific methods and techniques used to investigate crime. This course is intended to provide an introduction to understanding the science behind crime detection. Scientific methods specifically relevant to crime detection and analysis will be presented with emphasis placed upon techniques used in evaluating physical evidence. Laboratory exercises will include techniques commonly employed in forensic investigations.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Regents Living Environment; Suggested completion of 4 core Regents courses. Or co-enrollment or must have rec from Science DIL

 

SUPA Chemistry I & II/ Honors Chemistry (CHE106/107nd CHE 116/1117)

2 semesters; 1/2 HS credit each; 4 college credits each

This course now allows accelerated science students to take SUPA Chemistry without taking Regents Chemistry as a pre-requisite. Students can take this course by getting a recommendation from their current science teacher as well as achieving mastery (85+) on the regent’s exam in their current science course. They will take the Chemistry Regents as a post assessment, as well as the SUPA Final Exam. Get a fascinating and fundamental grasp of the underpinnings of reality (as we currently understand them!). You’ll investigate forms of energy atomic structure, quantum theory, periodic law, molecular geometry, properties of liquids and gases, and more. You will learn the concepts necessary for continued study in chemistry medicine biology engineering and physics. In the lab course (CHE 107), you’ll learn how to handle chemical and equipment safety and the correct procedures for manipulating and reporting data.

The second semester is a continuation of CHE 106/107, lectures and labs will more deeply explore the dynamic processes that make up the organic and inorganic world Topics include chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, thermochemistry and thermodynamics, electrochemistry, voltaic cells, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, and polymers. The lab portion (CHE 117) feature qualitative analyses of topics such as equilibrium, pH, and solubility.

Co-Requisite: Concurrent enrollment with the 3rd/4th Regents science and Trigonometry.

 

 

SUPA Major Concepts in Physics/Honors Physics (non –Calculus based, PHY101/111 and PHY102/112)

2 semesters; 1/2 HS credit each; 4 college credits each

This course now allows accelerated science students to take SUPA Major Concepts in Physics without taking Regents Physics as a pre-requisite. Students can take this course by getting a recommendation from their current science teacher. They will take the Physics Regents as a post assessment, as well as the SUPA Final Exam. This course is primarily about motions of objects and forces, which underlie these motions. The theory that describes the above phenomena was developed by Isaac Newton in the 17th century and is called “classical mechanics” which gave a foundation for development of all modern physics. Therefore, this course is an introduction to physics in general. Physics in turn provides a foundation for most other natural sciences and engineering. In Physics 102, you will learn about three great subject areas: electricity, magnetism, and light. Maxwell’s equations, which you will explore in this course, relate all three. The Laboratory section provides hands on intuition about general physics covered in the lecture courses while developing practical laboratory skills. Mini STEAM driven modules will be incorporated for real-world connections when applicable.

Pre-Requisite: Living Environment, Earth Science, Chemistry or co-enrollment; Passed Algebra II or must have rec from Science DIL

 

 

SUPA Physics I & II (Calculus based, PHY211/221 and PHY212/222)

2 semesters; 1/2 HS credit each; 4 college credits each

This course is primarily about motions of objects and forces, which underlie these motions. The theory that describes the above phenomena was developed by Isaac Newton in the 17th century and is called “classical mechanics” which gave a foundation for development of all modern physics. Therefore, this course is an introduction to physics in general. Physics in turn provides a foundation for most other natural sciences and engineering. In Physics 212, you will learn about three great subject areas: electricity, magnetism, and light. Maxwell’s equations, which you will explore in this course, relate all three. The Laboratory section provides hands on intuition about general physics covered in the lecture courses while developing practical laboratory skills. Mini STEAM driven modules will be incorporated for real-world connections when applicable.

Pre-Requisite: Living Environment, Earth Science, Chemistry or co-enrollment; Passed Algebra II or Must have rec from Science DIL.

Co-Requisite: Must be dual enrolled in Calculus

 

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Social Studies

In grades 9 and 10, Social Studies is taught at two levels:  Regents and Honors.

In grades 11 and 12, the Honors level course are dual enrollment college courses offered through Syracuse University Project Advance. All Honors Program (HP/CIC) students must maintain an 80 average. Four (4) years of Social Studies are required for graduation. Electives do not count toward the four year requirement.

Social Studies 9:   Global History and Geography I

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

Grade 9 begins with the Paleolithic Era and the development of the first civilizations, continues with an examination of classical societies, and traces the expansion of trade networks and their global impact. The course emphasizes the key themes of interactions over time, shifts in political power, and the role of belief systems. The first three Key Ideas review content from Grade 6 and will not require as much instructional time as other Key Ideas. Other Key Ideas may require additional instructional time such as Political Powers and Achievements, Transformation of Western Europe and Russia and Interactions and Disruptions. While the course emphasizes the importance of historical and spatial thinking, all of the social studies practices and standards are included in the study of global history and geography. May take at the Regents or Honors Level.

Social Studies 10 Global History and Geography II

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

Grade 10 provides a snapshot of the world circa 1750. The course continues chronologically up to the present. Several concepts are woven throughout the course including industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, conflict, technology, and the interconnectedness of the world. The last three key ideas focus on global issues, applying a more thematic approach. While the course emphasizes the importance of historical and spatial thinking, all of the social studies practices and standards are included in the study of global history and geography. Students in this course will be required to pass a Regents exam for graduation (Framework Exam).  May take at the Regents or Honors Level.

Prerequisites: Global History and Geography I

Social Studies 11 United States History and Government

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

Grade 11 begins with the colonial and constitutional foundations of the United States and explores the government structure and functions written in the Constitution. The development of the nation and the political, social, and economic factors that led to the challenges our nation faced in the Civil War are addressed. Industrialization, urbanization, and the accompanying problems are examined, along with America’s emergence as a world power, the two world wars of the 20th century, and the Cold War. Students explore the expansion of the federal government, the threat of terrorism, and the place of the United States in an increasingly globalized and interconnected world.  Course is rooted in the new Framework for Social Studies. Students are required to pass the Regents Examination in United States History and Government for graduation. May take at Regents or SUPA levels (see below for SUPA US History description).

Prerequisites: Global History and Geography II

SUPA US History (SS11)

Full year; 1 HS credit; 6 Syracuse University credits (History 101 and History 102)

The two courses (one semester each) provide a survey of the development of the United States from the Colonial period to America’s role in the post-Cold War world. Topics examined include Colonial America, the Age of Jackson, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Immigration, Industrialization and Urbanization, America as a world power, 20th century global conflicts, the Cold War, and America’s role today. Fulfills the NYS requirement for US History and Government.  Students will take the Regents exam at the end of the year which is a graduation requirement. Prerequisites: Global Studies 9, Global Studies 10, a score of 85% or better on the NYS Global Regents exam, and teacher recommendation. 

There is a per-credit fee for this course.

Prerequisites: Global History and Geography II HP or Global History and Geography II with teacher recommendation

Economics

1/2 year; 1/2  HS credit; 0 college credits 

“Economics, the Enterprise System, and Finance” examines the principles of the United States free market economy in a global context. Students will examine their individual responsibility for managing their personal finances. Students will analyze the role of supply and demand in determining the prices individuals and businesses face in the product and factor markets, and the global nature of these markets. Students will study changes to the workforce in the United States, and the role of entrepreneurs in our economy, as well as the effects of globalization. Students will explore the challenges facing the United States free market economy in a global environment and various policy-making opportunities available to government to address these challenges.

Prerequisite: United States History and Government

SUPA Economics

1/2 Year; 1/2 HS credit; 3 Syracuse University credits

SUPA Economics is a Syracuse University, three credit hour study of college level economic themes that both readies students for a further study of Micro and Macro Economics and satisfies the ½ credit graduation requirement for high school economics.

There is a per credit fee for this course.

Prerequisite: United States History and Government Grade level: 12

Participation in Government

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

Participation in Government is a course designed to illustrate to students the importance of their role as citizens in a democracy.  Participation in government and in our communities is fundamental to the success of American democracy. The point is for students to understand that they must become involved in their communities–being a good citizen is not merely voting.  This course aims to provide students with opportunities to become engaged in the political process by acquiring the knowledge and practicing the skills necessary for active citizenship.

This course will also look at different issues and determine how good citizens make up their minds about policy issues.  The overriding concept is the way in which we address social problems through development of public policy.  This course is project based with a significant amount of independent project work.  Critical thinking skills will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: United States History and Government.

SUPA Public Affairs

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 3 Syracuse University credits

SUPA PAF 101 introduces students to the basic skills of public policy analysis.  These skills include becoming willing and able to “do good” effectively, defining and identifying the components of public policy issues, communicating ideas and findings, collecting information, using graphs, tables and statistics, examining the use of surveys and informal interviews, identifying a social problem and coming up with a proposed policy to deal with it, listing costs and benefits of proposed policies, developing benchmarks to assess the impact of policy, analyzing political factors, developing strategies to implement a policy, identifying essential features of major current public policy issues and working in teams effectively.  Students who successfully complete the course receive three (3) college credits from Syracuse University transferable to hundreds of colleges and universities. Satisfies the high school graduation requirement for Participation in Government. 

There is a per credit fee for this course. 

Prerequisite: United States History and Government. Grade level: 12

SUPA Foundations of Human Behavior (Elective)

1/2 year; 1/2 credit; 3 Syracuse University credits

SUPA Psychology is offered through Syracuse University’s Project Advance.  The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by demanding performance equivalent to on-campus introductory courses.  Students who successfully complete the course, receive three (3) college credits from Syracuse – transferable to hundreds of colleges and universities.  Topics covered will include the study of people who influenced the discipline, human behavior, learning, development, individual differences, and assessment of these areas with various class activities. 

There is a per credit fee for this course. Grade Level: 11, 12

SUPA Introduction to Sociology (Elective)

1/2 year; 1/2 credit; 3 Syracuse University credits

SUPA Sociology is designed as an analytic, skills-based introduction to sociology.  The emphasis is on analytic reading and conceptual analysis.  It is a writing intensive course.  As the course progresses, students should obtain increasing skill in analytic reading and writing, sociological reasoning, empirical investigation, and in the ability to make empirical and conceptual generalizations about self and society in an increasingly global world.  This college-level course demands performance equivalent to the course offered on campus.  Students who successfully complete the course receive three (3) college credits from Syracuse University transferable to hundreds of colleges and universities.  This college-level course introduces C. Wright Mills’ classic notion of “the sociological imagination” and the promise of sociology, and encourages students to see and think about the relationship between themselves and the social world.

There is a per credit fee for this course.  Grade level: 11, 12

SUPA Human Development and Sport  (Elective)

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 3 Syracuse University credits

Human Development and Sport examine the dynamics of youth development, social change, and social inclusion in the context of sport. Students examine perspectives of youth development and principles of sport that facilitate personal, social, and cultural development. Students explore ways in which sport-for-development programs provide positive environments and opportunities for collaboration, social change, inclusion, and human enrichment. The connections of sport based initiative to community, national, and global development issues are explored. This is a great elective for anyone interested in sports and/or pursuing an athletic career choice.

Grade Level 11, 12

History through Film/Art/Music (Elective)

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit;  0 college credits

One way to learn about the past is to study how it is portrayed through movies, artwork, and the music associated with its historical themes.   In this course we will examine historical events by viewing films, listening to music, analyzing artwork, inter-active discussions of the historical context of each event, and reflective writing assignments.  The humanities provide some factual information about an historical figure, event, or time period; they can also distort the past depending on the point of view of the producers of movies, art, and music.  A major part of the course will be discussion of how major events of history are accurately and inaccurately portrayed through the arts. The study of an historical event through the humanities will focus students to develop an understanding about the times in which the materials were produced, so for each unit of study we will concentrate on two themes:  what do the arts tell a modern viewer about a particular time period; and what do the arts tell us about the time in which it was made.

Grade Level:  11, 12

Black History through Film/Art/Music (Elective)

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

One way to learn about the past is to study how it is portrayed through movies, artwork, and the music associated with its historical themes.   In this course we will examine historical events and figures of Black History by viewing films, listening to music, analyzing artwork, inter-active discussions of the historical context of each event, and reflective writing assignments. Although the humanities provide some factual information about an historical figure, event, or time period, they can also distort the past depending on the point of view of the producers of movies, art, and music.  A major part of the course will be discussion of how major events of history are accurately and inaccurately portrayed through the arts. The study of an historical event through the humanities will focus students to develop an understanding about the times in which the materials were produced, so for every each unit of study we will concentrate on two themes:  what do the arts tell a modern viewer about a particular time period and what do the arts tell us about the time in which it was made.

Grade Level:  11, 12

Military History 11-12 – 1 Unit

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

This full year course explores warfare through the ages from Ancient Times to the Persian Gulf War. A special emphasis is placed on the impact of key personalities, technologies and strategies on the course of key conflicts in human history. The course will be a more in depth look at warfare throughout the ages.  Special emphasis will be on the fighting styles, tactics and strategies of the ancient Greeks and Romans.  Additionally, the course will look at the change in fighting styles as technology improved and will include an in-depth look at how gunpowder changed warfare.  This elective is meant to build on and/or better prepare students for other general history courses.  The course requires a major amount of independent reading to prepare for class discussions. 

Pre-requisites junior or senior status and a minimum grade of 80 on the Global Studies Regents exam. Grade Level:  11, 12

 

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Technology 

 

Design and Drawing for Production

Full year; 1 HS credit (Foundation Course for Envision and Build Journey).

DDP meets NYS Requirement for 1 credit in the Arts. Drawing and design encourages visual problem solving using common graphic language to describe forms in the human-made environment. It provides experiences for the student to develop analytical skills and problem solving with real-world experiences. It provides the developmental foundations required in the process of product design and production. Students will be issued some basic drawing tools, such as a compass that they will be responsible for the same they are for textbooks.

 

Wood Manufacturing I

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit

Students will design and construct individual projects using the principles of good design, sound construction and safety. Students will learn to operate power machinery and proper construction procedures. Emphasis will be on quality, craftsmanship, good work ethic, and proper use of tools.

Pre-Requisite: DDP or Studio in Art

 

Wood Manufacturing II

1/2 Year; 1/2 HS credit

This course is a continuation of Wood Manufacturing I and will allow students to develop skills in the field of woodworking. It is project-based and student driven with a culminating project that should demonstrate advanced skills, such as different types of joints, surface preparation, and finishing techniques. Students will also explore various career opportunities available in construction and woodworking industries.

Pre-Requisites: DDP or Studio in Art, and Wood Manufacturing I

 

Manufacturing and Construction

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit

Manufacturing and production technology is a conscious exploration of the processes that take raw materials to finished goods Student teams take their designs from concept sketches to finished product while defining the systems structure of a manufacturing enterprise. Their manufacturing process activities will use CNC equipment; plastics mold design and rapid prototyping. Students explore construction systems including framing, HVAC, electrical plumbing and plot planning. Construction mathematics is emphasized using a transit n a laser level. In his unit students understand systems thinking and the integration of materials, labor, costs, and site management in every phase of the building.

Pre-Requisite: DDP or Studio in Art; Trigonometry or concurrent in Trigonometry or STEAM Math

 

Structural Engineering

1/2 Year; 1/2 HS credit

Structural Engineering is a field of engineering dealing with the analysis and design of structures that support or resist loads. Structural engineers are involved in the design of building and other structures. Their design must satisfy given criteria, safety, serviceability, and performance. Accounting for weather physical laws and materials performance are just some of the structural engineer’s considerations Projects will be student driven based on interest.

Pre-Requisite: DDP or Studio in Art, Trigonometry or concurrent in Trigonometry or STEAM Math

 

C++

 1/2 Year; 1/2 credit

In this introductory course, students learn basic programming and coding concepts through a series of hands-on projects. They also learn about software development careers, the software development process, and industry best practices. Using a variety of tools, including Microsoft Visual C++, students master the building blocks of programming; functions, variables, loops, arrays, and classes.

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Computer Science

 

Java

1/2 Year; 1/2 credit

This introductory-level one-semester course is designed for people who have very little programming experience, In Java Programming, students gain an understanding of Java platforms and learn how to build standalone applications. Students also learn techniques of Java and how Java can be used in cross-platform computing. At the end of the course, students are able to write basic programs in Java and are prepared for further instruction in any programming language.

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Computer Science and C++ Programming

 

Introduction to Game Industry

1/2 year; 1/2 credit

Video games are an increasingly important medium in terms of national use, cultural impact, and profitability. Digital gaming sales hit a record 61 billion in 2015. With a rapidly growing base of mainstream users, games are a medium that needs to be examined. However, this industry, its history, and the cultural practices it engenders have been seriously neglected in comparison to television and other media. This course has been designed as a broad introduction to the medium and history of video games and the industry. It draws from a wide variety of disciplines to examine video games as aesthetic products, cultural products, economic outputs, as a policy issue, as possible sources of effects and sites of community.

 

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Visual Arts 

Studio In Art

Full Year, 1 HS credit: 0 college credits

Students will be expected to read about, write about, and produce works of art. Studio In Art is a foundation course to bring together experiences in: creating, viewing and critiquing art; as well as, examining art history and aesthetics. Students will examine a range of traditional themes including: portraits, landscapes, the Elements of Art/ Principles of Design and still-life. These themes will be explored in a variety of mediums such as pencil, colored pencil, collage and paint. It is strongly recommended that students take this course in 9th grade. Students who successfully complete the Studio In Art course and wish to expand their experiences in an in-depth manner, should sign up for Elective Art courses during their 10th-12th grade years. Students are required to purchase pencils and erasers.

Sculpture

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credit

The Sculpture course requirements introduce students to the many different processes involved in 3D sculpture production. There are many schools of thought and applications in regard to sculpture and this course encourages a variety of mediums to be explored. Students will be expected to create original 3D works expressing their understanding of the “joining” process and its role in sculptural development. Methods in carving and construction will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Studio In Art. Pencil and sketchbook are required course materials.

 

Drawing and Painting

1 full year, 1 HS credit: 0 college credits

This course is for students interested in developing artistic skills in 2D mediums. This is a theme based drawing and painting course. Students will use various mediums including pencils, pastels and oil paints. Students will develop their art using portraiture, still-life, interiors, landscape and abstraction as themes for personal expression. Historical and cultural explorations will guide the themed approach. Students will not only be expected to critique their own work and process but that of their peers as well. Drawings, sketches, written responses are incorporated into the course required work.

Prerequisite: Studio In Art. Students are expected to provide pencils and erasers as required materials.

 

Drawing and Painting 2

Full year; 1 HS credit; 0 college credits

This course is designed to take students through a deeper experience in developing and improving drawing and painting skills. Students are required to use their sketchbook as an artist’s journal. They will write and work out ideas in order to progress through the creative process to producing original works of art. Sketching is expected and due dates/ deadlines are strictly enforced.

Prerequisite: Studio In Art and Drawing and Painting 1.

Students are required to provide pencils and erasers for this course.

 

Ceramics

1/2 year; 1/2 HS credit; 0 college credits

In ceramics the student will learn how to hand build and throw on the potters wheel. The student will produce both functional and non-functional 3D art forms out of clay. Students will be exposed to contemporary and historic artists. Visiting artists may be on site.

Prerequisite: Studio Art

 

Digital Art and Animation

Full year; 1 HS credit

This course is an introduction to various software to create digital art and images. Students will use: Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe After Effects, Maya 3D, Processing.org, and Sublime. Experiences will include: drawing and painting in Illustrator and Photoshop; working with composite images and photos in Photoshop; using 3D programs to create images and learn the 3D printer; using Processing. org and Sublime to code images and basic web designs; and using After Effects animation program to create motion graphics and tell stories through animation. Students who find they enjoy work in this medium can continue with SUNY Sullivan Computer Graphics 1, and/or AP 2D Design; see course descriptions for each.

 

SUNY Sullivan Computer Graphics

1 full year; 3 college credits

This course serves as an introduction to the use of the computer in graphic arts or graphic design. Students learn how to create and modify art using image editing, drawing, and publishing programs. Students also learn the relationships between software programs.

 

Advanced Placement Studio in Art: 2D Design

Juniors and Seniors ONLY; 1 credit; possible college credit if AP Studio Portfolio is completed successfully

AP is a CIC course that allows students to create a college-level portfolio. The 2D Design portfolio focuses on the principles of art and design. Works will focus on digital media, however, to demonstrate breadth and depth, analog media can be included. Must see AP teacher for permission and Pre-course assignment. *see AP instructor for Spring/Summer Pre-AP assignment

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Driver Education

1/2 year; 1/2 credit

This course is designed to develop proper attitudes that promote safe and courteous driving habits on our public roadways. Includes practical experience behind the wheel and classroom theory. Students must be 16 years of age by the start of the course. A New York State permit is not needed to begin the program but must be obtained shortly after the class begins.

Upon successful completion of the Driver Education Curriculum, students will receive a certificate (MV-285) that when submitted to DMV, changes their New York State license to a class “D” at age 17. This will grant students the privilege to legally drive after 9 p.m. The Pre-Licensing Course Certificate (MV-278) may also be issued to those students that need to schedule their road test. Depending on the insurance company, students may receive a discount upon successful conclusion of the program.

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