page top

red arrow bulletNews

Race to the Top of the World and the Common Core

December 7, 2012

The Common Core State Standards are part of the requirements of the Race to the Top (RTTT) federal educational initiative. New York was one of the states chosen in the second round of the RTTT competition. This qualified the state to receive $6.9 million to spend on education. - www.NYSED.gov 

Chase Principal Bill Frandino with studentsTo receive the money, schools in New York must make a number of changes and follow a variety of new regulations. These include implementing the CCSS, using data to drive instruction and make decisions that affect student learning, and adopting new teacher and principal evaluation plans.

By the 2013-2014 school year, all state assessments students are required to take in grades 3-8 will be based on the new standards. Regents exams will follow in 2014-2015. In addition, state exams may eventually be administered via computers and not on paper.

UTILIZING DATA TO INFORM AND ADJUST INSTRUCTION

Careful analysis of test results and student data allows inquiry teams - comprised of teachers, principals and other school personnel – to recognize exactly what a child is and is not learning. To help teachers accurately assess the level of each student’s knowledge, skills and understanding, benchmark exams are given throughout the school year. This allows teachers to focus on the curriculum areas that may need extra classroom time and identify students who may need extra help in specific areas. The school can then provide the individualized supports students need.

ANNUAL PROFESSIONAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW

Superintendent Daniel Teplesky, Assistant Superintendent Tammy Mangus and Kim MarshallRTTT requires school districts to follow a new set of guidelines when it comes to evaluating their teachers and principals. The new APPR - Annual Professional Performance Review - is more rigid than in the past and for the first time will rely on student assessment data for a portion of the overall rating a teacher receives. Part of a principal’s evaluation may be based on how well their school performs on the state assessments as a whole. The new APPR designations will rate teachers and principals as highly effective, effective, developing or ineffective every year. The new APPR will allow schools to provide professional development and individualized supports to teachers where needed. New York State requires that all school districts submit their APPR plan for approval by January 2013.

RTTT requires schools in New York to redesign public education to align with the modern day needs of society. These many changes will take much hard work, commitment and perseverance to get schools moving forward. The main goal of the Race to the Top initiative and for Monticello Schools is to increase student achievement and success during the educational process and to ensure that all children are college or career ready at graduation. As a democratic nation, it is our duty to educate our population to be productive citizens in our communities. RTTT is designed to help us rise to the task of setting the standard in innovation as a 21st century global leader in the technologically-based world of today and the still-to-be-defined workplaces of tomorrow.

Photos: Chase Elementary School Principal Bill Frandino discusses an English language arts lesson with fourth grade students.

From left, Monticello Schools Superintendent Daniel Teplesky, teacher effectiveness guru and author Kim Marshall and Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction Tammy Mangus at a recent professional development seminar for staff members. Monticello Schools is utilizing the Kim Marshall evaluation rubrics in its newly adopted APPRs for teachers and administrators. For more about Kim Marshall, visit www.marshallmemo.com or www.nlns.org.

Monticello School District APPRs Approved by NY State

Monticello submitted its APPR plans for teachers and administrators to the New York State Education Department (NYSED) for approval after they were adopted by the Board of Education at its November 15 meeting. The plans were officially approved by NYSED on December 17, 2012. LINK to Monticello CSD's APPRs

CLICK HERE for more information about NY State’s new evaluation system for educators.

WHAT IS AN SLO?

SLO is an acronym for Student Learning Objective. An SLO is a plan teachers develop to set academic goals for individual students in their classes. It includes a description of classroom learning and will be used to measure student growth. Monticello teachers are participating in ongoing professional development to learn how to utilize assessments to set goals and customize instruction. Under the new APPR requirements, part of a teacher’s evaluation is based on the amount of improvement or growth a student demonstrates during the school year.

Top photo: Emma C. Chase Elementary School Principal Bill Frandino discusses an English language arts lesson with fourth grade students.

Bottom photo: From left, Monticello Schools Superintendent Daniel Teplesky, teacher effectiveness guru and author Kim Marshall and Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction Tammy Mangus at a recent professional development seminar for staff members. Monticello Schools is utilizing the Kim Marshall evaluation rubrics in its newly adopted APPR for teachers and administrators. For more about Kim Marshall, visit www.marshallmemo.com or www.nlns.org.